Harvard Referencing: Internet/websites

Related links within this guide

Harvard Referencing: web content

Basic format to reference material from the web

The basics of a Reference List entry for a Web page or Web document:

  • Author or authors. The surname is followed by first initials.
  • Year.
  • Title (in italics).
  • Date viewed.
  • Web address <in angled brackets>.

Example:
HealthInsite 2011, Complementary and alternative therapies, National Health Call Centre Network, viewed 14 September 2011, <http://www.healthinsite.gov.au/topics/Complementary_and_Alternative_Therapies>.
 

  • Include author(s) name(s) for internet/website references where possible (an author may be a corporate body or organisation responsible for creating, producing or publishing a webpage or website.
  • Where there is no identifiable author or authoring body, use the title of the webpage or website
  • The year is the time of the last update of the web page or document.

Referencing material from the web: Examples

Material Type In-text example Reference List example

Website

Indirect quote

Complementary and conventional medicine when used together is known as integrative medicine (HealthInsite 2011)

HealthInsite 2011, Complementary and alternative therapies, National Health Call Centre Network, viewed 14 September 2011, <http://www.healthinsite.gov.au/topics/Complementary and Alternative Therapies>.

Webpage: No Author

(Occupy Melbourne 2011)

Only use the first few words of a page title if it is too long.

Occupy Melbourne 2011, Beat, viewed 17 October 2011, <http://www.beat.com.au/arts/occupy-melbourne>.

 

Webpage: No Date

(Nutrition Australia n.d.)

 Nutrition Australia n.d., Healthy eating schools, Nutrition Australia, viewed 17 October 2011, <http://www.nutritionaustralia.org/vic/healthy-eating-schools>. 

Use the abbreviation n.d. for "no date".

Web Document

The Department of Human Services (2001, p.33) found that '...'
OR
It has been reported that '...' (Department of Human Services 2001, p.33)

Department of Human Services 2001, Achieving service quality improvement: best practice initiatives in placement and support services 2000-2001, Child Protection and Juvenile Justice Branch, Community Care Division, Department of Human Services, Melbourne, viewed 2 September 2010,
<http://www.cyf.vic.gov.au/data/assets/pdf.../Placement_Support_SQI_2001.pdf >.

… as stated in the Section C - Fire Resistance of the National Construction Code Series (Australian Building Codes Board 2015)…

Australian Building Codes Board 2015, National Construction Code 2015 Building Code of Australia Volume One, Australian Building Codes Board, viewed 22 May 2015, <http://services.abcb.gov.au/NCCOnline/Publications/2015/Volume1>.

Blog Post

(Wilton 2010)

Wilton, P 2010, ‘Proteins prove their metal’, Oxford Science Blog, weblog post, 7 July, viewed 10 August 2011, <http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/science_blog/100707.html>.

Computer Software (OpenOffice.org 2011) OpenOffice.org 2011, computer software, downloaded 17 October 2011, <http://www.openoffice.org>.

 

 

Video Transcript

This video will demonstrate how to reference a book using Victoria University’s Harvard style. Follow the same steps to reference an e-book.

Slide 2 Image on screen: In text-example. Open Bracket first author’s surname name ampersand second authors surname year close bracket. Bibliography example. Explanation: In Harvard Style you must acknowledge your sources of information in the text of your writing and in a reference list at the end. Brief details of your sources are provided in the text of your writing, full details are listed in the reference list. References in your reference list are listed in alphabetical order by the author’s last name.

Slide 3 Image on screen: Paragraph of writing. Explanation: When presenting ideas or information from a source, such as a web page include the author’s surname and date of publication in brackets within the text of your writing. If you cannot find author details use the name of the organisation responsible for the web page. When presenting ideas or information from a source, such as a web page include the author’s surname and date of publication in brackets within the text of your writing. If you cannot find author details use the name of the organisation responsible for the web page. Where you refer to the author’s name in the body of the text, include the date of publication in brackets. When quoting directly from the source include the author and date of publication and place quotation marks around the quote. Include page numbers if available.

Slide 4 Image on screen: Web page example. Explanation: When referencing a webpage you need to take note of the following: The author of the web page, this could be a named author or the organisation who publishes the web page. In this example the author is VicRoads. The date the web page was created or last updated. This is often found at the bottom of the page. The title of the web page. In this example it would be Issues and Initiatives for Young Drivers. The name of the publisher of the webpage and place of publication if that information is available. At times the publisher and author may be the same. Place of publication can be found under web page contact information. Copy and paste the URL from the web page into your reference list. This url should link directly to the information you are referring to. The date you viewed the page is also included in the reference.

Slide 5 Image on screen: Web page elements of a reference. Author’s name VicRoads. Year 2014. Title Issues and Initiatives for Young Drivers. Publisher and place of publication VicRoads, Kew, Victoria. Date viewed viewed 4th February 2014. URL https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/safety-and-road-rules/driver-safety/young-and-new-drivers/issues-and-initiatives-for-young-drivers

Slide 6 Further help available on Victoria University’s Harvard libguide (http://libraryguides.vu.edu.au/harvard) or go to the contacts and help page on the library website.

(video ends)