Bachelor of Laws: Sports Law

A comprehensive guide to legal research created by the VU Law Library

Textbooks

Related Subjects in VU Catalogue

Abbreviations

Abbreviations are used to identify the law report series in which a judgment has been published.  In the case of unreported judgments an abbreviation for the court is used.
Some useful tools for looking up abbreviations are:

Hardcopy Legal Dictionaries

Sports Tribunals & Authorities

Sports Law Websites

Sport

Any game, exercise, pastime, fight, or contest, including any form of racing (such as bicycle, foot, or horse racing), cricket or football matches and swimming carnivals: for example (ACT) Gaming and Betting Act 1906 (NSW) s 2; cf (VIC) Lotteries, Gaming and Betting Act 1966 s 30.

(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

Legal Research Basics

Citations
Citations or references are a way of describing a document in sufficient detail so that others can identify exactly what document you are referring to.  For more information about referencing please see the Referencing & Plagiarism Guide.

Primary Sources
Law made by law making bodies such as parliament (Acts) and the courts (judgments).

Law Reports
Judgments and cases (the terms are interchangeable) are a primary source of law.  When they are considered important or significant enough to be published they are printed in law reports.  Law reports are simply collections of published judgments.  For more information on case law and law report please see the case law tab in this guide.

Secondary Sources
Secondary sources discuss, explain or describe the law.  Books, journal articles, legal encyclopedias and case digests are all examples of secondary sources.  They are especially useful for students because they are often explanatory in nature and so are easier to understand than primary sources such as cases and legislation.

Online Databases
On this web page you will find many links to useful content in various legal databases. The links are divided up by subject and are designed to take the user directly to the content within each database - no searching required.

However, there will be times when you need to search for information.  The two most useful databases for non-law students studying this subject are AGIS-Plus Text and FirstPoint

AGIS (Attorney Generals Information Service) is the leading legal journals database in Australia.  It is an index of Australian and New Zealand legal journals articles from 1975 to the present and is the fastest and easiest way to find legal journal articles.  It contains records of articles published on all aspects of law, including sports law.  AGIS allows the user to search across hundreds of different journals and locate articles in a number of ways including by:

  • Author
  • Title
  • Subject
  • Jurisdiction

View the guide to AGIS for more information.

FirstPoint is a case citator.  A case citator is a tool that allows users to locate case law and useful information about that case law.  It provides an index to and summary of case law.  It allows its user to search across jurisdictions and time to locate cases.

Of course, it is possible to search case law directly without using a case citator. Case law is available online in full-text in various databases.  The problem for the researcher is that the structure of these databases, their coverage and the layout of the judgments themselves varies.  This makes searching difficult, time consuming and adds greatly to the risk of not finding the judgments being sought.

Case citators solve the problem of having to search multiple databases containing judgments in inconsistent formats.  They do this by providing the researcher with a single database that contains consistently structured and formatted descriptions of judgments. 

Although the case citator databases do not contain the full-text of judgments they do provide links to where they are available online or, at the very least, a citation that would allow the researcher to locate the judgment in hard-copy.

In Australia there are two leading commercially produced case citators and one that is freely available from Austlii.  All have their own strengths and subtle differences. View the FirstPoint guide for more information.

Tort Law

A civil wrong distinguished from the law of contract, the law of restitution, and the criminal law.
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The links to legal encyclopedias provide a general overview of the topic. 

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Product Liability Law

The legal liability of a manufacturer (and others, such as importers, repairers and distributors) for defective products, which arises from the common law duty owed to product users and others, irrespective of the existence of a contractual relationship: Donoghue v Stevenson [1932] AC 562 . The standard of care required at common law is proportional to the degree of risk of injury. Manufacturers and others also attract strict liability for defective products under statute: (CTH) Trade Practices Act 1974 Pt V Div 2A, Pt VA, and for supplies from 1 January 2011, under Australian Consumer Law ss 138, 139, 140, 141 and 271.
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The links to legal encyclopedias provide a general overview of the topic. 

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Key legislation is also linked below.  These links will always retrieve the current version of the Act.  Please refer back to the roadmap for commentary.

Agency Laws

A relationship involving authority or capacity in one person (the agent) to create or affect legal relations between another person (the principal) and third parties: International Harvester Company of Australia Pty Ltd v Carrigan’s Hazeldene Pastoral Co (1958) 100 CLR 644 ; 32 ALJ 160 ; [1958] HCA 16 . A relationship of agency may be created in the following ways: by the express or implied agreement of principal and agent; by the principal’s subsequent ratification of the agent’s acts done on behalf of the principal; by operation of law; by statute; or by estoppel under the doctrine of apparent (or ostensible) authority.
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The links to legal encyclopedias provide a general overview of the topic. 

Contract Law

A contract is a legally binding form or document that embodies the terms of an agreement between parties. Contract law regulates the rights, obligations and enforcement of contracts. 
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The links to legal encyclopedias provide a general overview of the topic. 

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Employment Law

Employment law.  The area of law concerned with the relationship between the employer and the individual employee. It differs from industrial law. Employment law regulates the formation, performance, and termination of a contract of employment as the basis of the employment relationship.
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Key legislation is also linked below.  These links will always retrieve the current version of the Act.  Please refer back to the roadmap for commentary.

Anti-Discrimination Law

Any distinction, exclusion, restriction, or preference made on a particular basis, such as race, sex, religion, national origin, marital status, pregnancy, or disability, which has the purpose or effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment, or exercise, on an equal footing, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, or any other field of life: International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of (INT) Racial Discrimination 1966. It can be either direct or indirect. Discrimination on particular grounds is prohibited by legislation: for example, (CTH) Sex Discrimination Act 1984; (NSW) Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Key legislation is also linked below.  These links will always retrieve the current version of the Act.  Please refer back to the roadmap for commentary.

Intellectual Property

Exclusive rights to the results of creative and intellectual effort, protected by common law or statute in areas such as copyright, design, patent, circuit layouts, plant varieties, confidential information, trade mark and business reputation (passing off and trade practices). Intellectual property comprises industrial property (patent, design and trade mark) and artistic property (copyright).
(Encyclopaedic Australian Legal Dictionary, 2009)

The roadmaps focus on a specific aspect of the topic and provide a summary with links to more detail if required.  The roadmaps also provide a list of relevant case law and legislation for each topic.

Key legislation is linked below.  These links will always retrieve the current version of the Act.  Please refer back to the roadmap for commentary.

Sports Law Journals in Print and Online

AGIS (Attorney Generals Information Service) - is the leading legal journals database in Australia.  Use AGIS to search hundreds of journals for articles about Sports Law. 

More information about AGIS is available on the Journals Tab.

If you wish to browse, then the journals below may be useful places to start.

CCH Roadmap Video - Learn More About CCH Roadmaps

The CCH Roadmaps available via this LibGuide are great for when you are studying a subject for the first time. They provide a quick overview of CCH commentary, key cases, legislation, Q&A and more without having to wade through the entire text. Links take you directly to the relevant content should you wish to learn more about a particular topic based on the summary.

Video transcript for Introducing CCH Road Maps

Introducing CCH Roadmaps

Introducing road maps your research accelerator free to CCH online customers. If you're delving into unfamiliar subject matter or you just need a quick summary of all the up-to-date material contained within CCH commentary then look no further than CCH road maps.

You can find what you need fast with road maps.

Road maps are a quick overview of CCH commentary, key cases, legislation, Q&A and more without having to wade through the entire text plus you have links to take you directly to the relevant content from your subscription for a more detailed view.

Once you've logged into your CCH online subscription enter your search term into the intelliConnect search bar and hit go.
 
Here we use the term mental harm.

From the filter sidebar on the screens left, click on by document type, then select road maps, then click on the relevant roadmap. 

Let's expand the document preview panel for a closer look.  First you will see brief excerpts from key commentary that illuminates the subject of the roadmap. At the right of each excerpt there are links that will take you to the full version at that commentary. You can click through, read, review and then return to the roadmap.

Then if we scroll down to the base of the roadmap you'll see key legislation in cases with links that take you directly to them. Again click-through read, review and then return to the roadmap.

Let's take a closer look at key cases. You can use the Austlii facility built into your subscription to discover linked to cases available in the Austlii citator. Just activate the Austlii links using the tool bar to the left of your preview panel. Links to key cases are now highlighted in green. Click on a linked case and you'll be taken directly to the case. When you've reviewed the case in Austelii you can close the panel to return to your CCH roadmap. 

Road maps, your research accelerator free to CCH online customers. There were even more handy research tips available online now just click the read link to visit our online resource center.

Thank you for watching

View the video on the Sport Law page